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April 30, 2019, 3:31 pm
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Avon Youth Baseball

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April 27, 2019, 4:49 pm
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October 28, 2016, 2:45 pm
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2 - 0
Avon Youth Baseball

Match Report

A feeling that the German side was arrogantly expecting victory was picked up on and utilised by the Norwich team. Bryan Gunn recalls:

It was disappointing that the Bayern management didn’t show us any respect, there was an air of arrogance about them. We used that as a stimulus.

Some 12 minutes into the match Rob Newman’s floated cross was headed away weakly by a back-pedalling Matthäus, towards the edge of the Bayern Munich penalty area. It fell straight into the path of Jeremy Goss. “I didn’t have to adjust my stride, I just hit it on the volley with my right foot. It was as sweet as anything”, said Goss.[16] The result was “a screaming 20-yard volley” into the top left hand corner of the net.

After 15 minutes, a serious injury forced striker Mark Robins off. He was replaced by Daryl Sutch, but just three minutes later, Ian Crook knocked a free kick from the half way line towards the back post. Chris Sutton and Oliver Kreuzer jumped for the ball, which floated over their heads. Stealing in behind both of them, Mark Bowen met the ball with a stooping header, which flew past a stranded Raimond Aumann, giving Norwich a two-goal lead. A shocked John Motson commented, “And Norwich are two up. This is almost fantasy football!”.

In the 40th minute, Munich pressure told when a cross from Jorginho was converted by Christian Nerlinger. Nerlinger beat Spencer Prior to the ball and successfully steered his header inside Bryan Gunn’s left hand post.

After the interval, most of the game was contested in the Norwich half, with Matthäus in particular proving to be instrumental in orchestrating many of the Bayern Munich attacks. After 70 minutes, Matthäus forced Gunn to save, low to his right with an effort that took a deflection. The subsequent corner ended with Jorginho curling a low cross into a crowded penalty area, where Adolfo Valencia’s header from just six yards out was saved by Gunn. The resulting rebound from Kreuzer came to nothing as he fired over the crossbar.

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October 26, 2016, 2:00 pm
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1 - 1
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Match Report

All eleven Scottish players were selected from Queen’s Park, the leading Scottish club at this time. Scotland had hoped to obtain the services of Arthur Kinnaird of The Wanderers and Henry Renny-Tailyour of Royal Engineers but both were unavailable. The teams for this match were got together “with some difficulty, each side losing some of their best men almost at the last moment” The Scottish side was selected by goalkeeper and captain Robert Gardner. The English side was selected from nine different clubs and was selected by Charles Alcock, who himself was unable to play due to injury.The match, initially scheduled for 2pm, was delayed for 20 minutes. The 4,000 spectators paid an entry fee of a shilling, the same amount charged at the 1872 FA Cup Final.

The Scots wore dark blue shirts. This match is, however, not the origin of the blue Scotland shirt, as contemporary reports of the 5 February 1872 rugby international at the Oval clearly show that “the Scotch were easily distinguishable by their uniform of blue jerseys…. the jerseys having the thistle embroidered.” The thistle had been worn previously in the 1871 rugby international. The English wore white shirts. The English wore caps, while the Scots wore red cowls.

The match itself illustrated the advantage gained by the Queen’s Park players “through knowing each others’ play ” as all came from the same club. Contemporary match reports clearly show dribbling play by both the English and the Scottish sides, for example: “The Scotch now came away with a great rush, Leckie and others dribbling the ball so smartly that the English lines were closely besieged and the ball was soon behind”, “Weir now had a splendid run for Scotland into the heart of his opponents’ territory ” and “Kerr.. closed the match by the most brilliant run of the day, dribbling the ball past the whole field.” Although the Scottish team are acknowledged to have worked better together during the first half, the contemporary account in the Scotsman newspaper acknowledges that in the second half England played similarly: “During the first half of the game the English team did not work so well together, but in the second half they left nothing to be desired in this respect. ” There is no specific description of a passing manoeuvre in the lengthy contemporary match reports, although two weeks’ later The Graphic reported “[Scotland] seem to be adepts at passing the ball”. There is no evidence in the article that the author attended the match, as the reader is clearly pointed to match descriptions in “sporting journals”. It is also of note that the 5 March 1872 match between Wanderers and Queen’s Park contains no evidence of ball passing.

On a pitch that was heavy due to the continuous rain over the previous three days, the smaller and lighter Scottish side pushed their English counterparts hard. The Scots had a goal disallowed in the first half after the umpires decided that the ball had cleared the tape. The latter part of the match saw the Scots defence under pressure by the heavier English forwards. The Scots played two full backs, two half backs and six forwards. The English played only one full back, one half back and eight forwards. Since three defenders were required for a ball played to be onside, the English system was virtually a ready-made offside trap. Scotland would come closest to winning the match when, in the closing stages, a Robert Leckie shot landed on top of the tape which was used to represent the crossbar.[1] At some point in the game, the England goalkeeper, Robert Barker, decided to join the action outfield when he switched places with William Maynard.

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September 28, 2016, 2:00 pm
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1 - 4
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Match Report

All eleven Scottish players were selected from Queen’s Park, the leading Scottish club at this time. Scotland had hoped to obtain the services of Arthur Kinnaird of The Wanderers and Henry Renny-Tailyour of Royal Engineers but both were unavailable. The teams for this match were got together “with some difficulty, each side losing some of their best men almost at the last moment” The Scottish side was selected by goalkeeper and captain Robert Gardner. The English side was selected from nine different clubs and was selected by Charles Alcock, who himself was unable to play due to injury.The match, initially scheduled for 2pm, was delayed for 20 minutes. The 4,000 spectators paid an entry fee of a shilling, the same amount charged at the 1872 FA Cup Final.

The Scots wore dark blue shirts. This match is, however, not the origin of the blue Scotland shirt, as contemporary reports of the 5 February 1872 rugby international at the Oval clearly show that “the Scotch were easily distinguishable by their uniform of blue jerseys…. the jerseys having the thistle embroidered.” The thistle had been worn previously in the 1871 rugby international. The English wore white shirts. The English wore caps, while the Scots wore red cowls.

The match itself illustrated the advantage gained by the Queen’s Park players “through knowing each others’ play ” as all came from the same club. Contemporary match reports clearly show dribbling play by both the English and the Scottish sides, for example: “The Scotch now came away with a great rush, Leckie and others dribbling the ball so smartly that the English lines were closely besieged and the ball was soon behind”, “Weir now had a splendid run for Scotland into the heart of his opponents’ territory ” and “Kerr.. closed the match by the most brilliant run of the day, dribbling the ball past the whole field.” Although the Scottish team are acknowledged to have worked better together during the first half, the contemporary account in the Scotsman newspaper acknowledges that in the second half England played similarly: “During the first half of the game the English team did not work so well together, but in the second half they left nothing to be desired in this respect. ” There is no specific description of a passing manoeuvre in the lengthy contemporary match reports, although two weeks’ later The Graphic reported “[Scotland] seem to be adepts at passing the ball”. There is no evidence in the article that the author attended the match, as the reader is clearly pointed to match descriptions in “sporting journals”. It is also of note that the 5 March 1872 match between Wanderers and Queen’s Park contains no evidence of ball passing.

On a pitch that was heavy due to the continuous rain over the previous three days, the smaller and lighter Scottish side pushed their English counterparts hard. The Scots had a goal disallowed in the first half after the umpires decided that the ball had cleared the tape. The latter part of the match saw the Scots defence under pressure by the heavier English forwards. The Scots played two full backs, two half backs and six forwards. The English played only one full back, one half back and eight forwards. Since three defenders were required for a ball played to be onside, the English system was virtually a ready-made offside trap. Scotland would come closest to winning the match when, in the closing stages, a Robert Leckie shot landed on top of the tape which was used to represent the crossbar.[1] At some point in the game, the England goalkeeper, Robert Barker, decided to join the action outfield when he switched places with William Maynard.

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August 28, 2016, 2:45 pm
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1 - 2
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Match Report

A feeling that the German side was arrogantly expecting victory was picked up on and utilised by the Norwich team.

It was disappointing that the Bayern management didn’t show us any respect, there was an air of arrogance about them. We used that as a stimulus.

Some 12 minutes into the match Rob Newman’s floated cross was headed away weakly by a back-pedalling Matthäus, towards the edge of the Bayern Munich penalty area. It fell straight into the path of Jeremy Goss. “I didn’t have to adjust my stride, I just hit it on the volley with my right foot. It was as sweet as anything”, said Goss.[16] The result was “a screaming 20-yard volley” into the top left hand corner of the net.

After 15 minutes, a serious injury forced striker Mark Robins off. He was replaced by Daryl Sutch, but just three minutes later, Ian Crook knocked a free kick from the half way line towards the back post. Chris Sutton and Oliver Kreuzer jumped for the ball, which floated over their heads. Stealing in behind both of them, Mark Bowen met the ball with a stooping header, which flew past a stranded Raimond Aumann, giving Norwich a two-goal lead. A shocked John Motson commented, “And Norwich are two up. This is almost fantasy football!”.

In the 40th minute, Munich pressure told when a cross from Jorginho was converted by Christian Nerlinger. Nerlinger beat Spencer Prior to the ball and successfully steered his header inside Bryan Gunn’s left hand post.

After the interval, most of the game was contested in the Norwich half, with Matthäus in particular proving to be instrumental in orchestrating many of the Bayern Munich attacks. After 70 minutes, Matthäus forced Gunn to save, low to his right with an effort that took a deflection. The subsequent corner ended with Jorginho curling a low cross into a crowded penalty area, where Adolfo Valencia’s header from just six yards out was saved by Gunn. The resulting rebound from Kreuzer came to nothing as he fired over the crossbar.

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August 28, 2016, 2:00 pm
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1 - 2
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Match Report

A feeling that the German side was arrogantly expecting victory was picked up on and utilised by the Norwich team. Bryan Gunn recalls:

It was disappointing that the Bayern management didn’t show us any respect, there was an air of arrogance about them. We used that as a stimulus.

Some 12 minutes into the match Rob Newman’s floated cross was headed away weakly by a back-pedalling Matthäus, towards the edge of the Bayern Munich penalty area. It fell straight into the path of Jeremy Goss. “I didn’t have to adjust my stride, I just hit it on the volley with my right foot. It was as sweet as anything”, said Goss.[16] The result was “a screaming 20-yard volley” into the top left hand corner of the net.

After 15 minutes, a serious injury forced striker Mark Robins off. He was replaced by Daryl Sutch, but just three minutes later, Ian Crook knocked a free kick from the half way line towards the back post. Chris Sutton and Oliver Kreuzer jumped for the ball, which floated over their heads. Stealing in behind both of them, Mark Bowen met the ball with a stooping header, which flew past a stranded Raimond Aumann, giving Norwich a two-goal lead. A shocked John Motson commented, “And Norwich are two up. This is almost fantasy football!”.

In the 40th minute, Munich pressure told when a cross from Jorginho was converted by Christian Nerlinger. Nerlinger beat Spencer Prior to the ball and successfully steered his header inside Bryan Gunn’s left hand post.

After the interval, most of the game was contested in the Norwich half, with Matthäus in particular proving to be instrumental in orchestrating many of the Bayern Munich attacks. After 70 minutes, Matthäus forced Gunn to save, low to his right with an effort that took a deflection. The subsequent corner ended with Jorginho curling a low cross into a crowded penalty area, where Adolfo Valencia’s header from just six yards out was saved by Gunn. The resulting rebound from Kreuzer came to nothing as he fired over the crossbar.

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July 28, 2016, 2:00 pm
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1 - 0
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Match Report

A feeling that the German side was arrogantly expecting victory was picked up on and utilised by the Norwich team. Bryan Gunn recalls:

It was disappointing that the Bayern management didn’t show us any respect, there was an air of arrogance about them. We used that as a stimulus.

Some 12 minutes into the match Rob Newman’s floated cross was headed away weakly by a back-pedalling Matthäus, towards the edge of the Bayern Munich penalty area. It fell straight into the path of Jeremy Goss. “I didn’t have to adjust my stride, I just hit it on the volley with my right foot. It was as sweet as anything”, said Goss.[16] The result was “a screaming 20-yard volley” into the top left hand corner of the net.

After 15 minutes, a serious injury forced striker Mark Robins off. He was replaced by Daryl Sutch, but just three minutes later, Ian Crook knocked a free kick from the half way line towards the back post. Chris Sutton and Oliver Kreuzer jumped for the ball, which floated over their heads. Stealing in behind both of them, Mark Bowen met the ball with a stooping header, which flew past a stranded Raimond Aumann, giving Norwich a two-goal lead. A shocked John Motson commented, “And Norwich are two up. This is almost fantasy football!”.

In the 40th minute, Munich pressure told when a cross from Jorginho was converted by Christian Nerlinger. Nerlinger beat Spencer Prior to the ball and successfully steered his header inside Bryan Gunn’s left hand post.

After the interval, most of the game was contested in the Norwich half, with Matthäus in particular proving to be instrumental in orchestrating many of the Bayern Munich attacks. After 70 minutes, Matthäus forced Gunn to save, low to his right with an effort that took a deflection. The subsequent corner ended with Jorginho curling a low cross into a crowded penalty area, where Adolfo Valencia’s header from just six yards out was saved by Gunn. The resulting rebound from Kreuzer came to nothing as he fired over the crossbar.

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July 27, 2016, 3:29 pm
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1 - 2
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Match Report

A feeling that the German side was arrogantly expecting victory was picked up on and utilised by the Norwich team. Bryan Gunn recalls:

It was disappointing that the Bayern management didn’t show us any respect, there was an air of arrogance about them. We used that as a stimulus.

Some 12 minutes into the match Rob Newman’s floated cross was headed away weakly by a back-pedalling Matthäus, towards the edge of the Bayern Munich penalty area. It fell straight into the path of Jeremy Goss. “I didn’t have to adjust my stride, I just hit it on the volley with my right foot. It was as sweet as anything”, said Goss.[16] The result was “a screaming 20-yard volley” into the top left hand corner of the net.

After 15 minutes, a serious injury forced striker Mark Robins off. He was replaced by Daryl Sutch, but just three minutes later, Ian Crook knocked a free kick from the half way line towards the back post. Chris Sutton and Oliver Kreuzer jumped for the ball, which floated over their heads. Stealing in behind both of them, Mark Bowen met the ball with a stooping header, which flew past a stranded Raimond Aumann, giving Norwich a two-goal lead. A shocked John Motson commented, “And Norwich are two up. This is almost fantasy football!”.

In the 40th minute, Munich pressure told when a cross from Jorginho was converted by Christian Nerlinger. Nerlinger beat Spencer Prior to the ball and successfully steered his header inside Bryan Gunn’s left hand post.

After the interval, most of the game was contested in the Norwich half, with Matthäus in particular proving to be instrumental in orchestrating many of the Bayern Munich attacks. After 70 minutes, Matthäus forced Gunn to save, low to his right with an effort that took a deflection. The subsequent corner ended with Jorginho curling a low cross into a crowded penalty area, where Adolfo Valencia’s header from just six yards out was saved by Gunn. The resulting rebound from Kreuzer came to nothing as he fired over the crossbar.

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June 28, 2016, 2:00 pm
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3 - 2
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Match Report

A feeling that the German side was arrogantly expecting victory was picked up on and utilised by the Norwich team. Bryan Gunn recalls:

It was disappointing that the Bayern management didn’t show us any respect, there was an air of arrogance about them. We used that as a stimulus.

Some 12 minutes into the match Rob Newman’s floated cross was headed away weakly by a back-pedalling Matthäus, towards the edge of the Bayern Munich penalty area. It fell straight into the path of Jeremy Goss. “I didn’t have to adjust my stride, I just hit it on the volley with my right foot. It was as sweet as anything”, said Goss.[16] The result was “a screaming 20-yard volley” into the top left hand corner of the net.

After 15 minutes, a serious injury forced striker Mark Robins off. He was replaced by Daryl Sutch, but just three minutes later, Ian Crook knocked a free kick from the half way line towards the back post. Chris Sutton and Oliver Kreuzer jumped for the ball, which floated over their heads. Stealing in behind both of them, Mark Bowen met the ball with a stooping header, which flew past a stranded Raimond Aumann, giving Norwich a two-goal lead. A shocked John Motson commented, “And Norwich are two up. This is almost fantasy football!”.

In the 40th minute, Munich pressure told when a cross from Jorginho was converted by Christian Nerlinger. Nerlinger beat Spencer Prior to the ball and successfully steered his header inside Bryan Gunn’s left hand post.

After the interval, most of the game was contested in the Norwich half, with Matthäus in particular proving to be instrumental in orchestrating many of the Bayern Munich attacks. After 70 minutes, Matthäus forced Gunn to save, low to his right with an effort that took a deflection. The subsequent corner ended with Jorginho curling a low cross into a crowded penalty area, where Adolfo Valencia’s header from just six yards out was saved by Gunn. The resulting rebound from Kreuzer came to nothing as he fired over the crossbar.

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April 28, 2016, 2:50 pm
v v v
3 - 0
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Match Report

A feeling that the German side was arrogantly expecting victory was picked up on and utilised by the Norwich team. Bryan Gunn recalls:

It was disappointing that the Bayern management didn’t show us any respect, there was an air of arrogance about them. We used that as a stimulus.

Some 12 minutes into the match Rob Newman’s floated cross was headed away weakly by a back-pedalling Matthäus, towards the edge of the Bayern Munich penalty area. It fell straight into the path of Jeremy Goss. “I didn’t have to adjust my stride, I just hit it on the volley with my right foot. It was as sweet as anything”, said Goss.[16] The result was “a screaming 20-yard volley” into the top left hand corner of the net.

After 15 minutes, a serious injury forced striker Mark Robins off. He was replaced by Daryl Sutch, but just three minutes later, Ian Crook knocked a free kick from the half way line towards the back post. Chris Sutton and Oliver Kreuzer jumped for the ball, which floated over their heads. Stealing in behind both of them, Mark Bowen met the ball with a stooping header, which flew past a stranded Raimond Aumann, giving Norwich a two-goal lead. A shocked John Motson commented, “And Norwich are two up. This is almost fantasy football!”.

In the 40th minute, Munich pressure told when a cross from Jorginho was converted by Christian Nerlinger. Nerlinger beat Spencer Prior to the ball and successfully steered his header inside Bryan Gunn’s left hand post.

After the interval, most of the game was contested in the Norwich half, with Matthäus in particular proving to be instrumental in orchestrating many of the Bayern Munich attacks. After 70 minutes, Matthäus forced Gunn to save, low to his right with an effort that took a deflection. The subsequent corner ended with Jorginho curling a low cross into a crowded penalty area, where Adolfo Valencia’s header from just six yards out was saved by Gunn. The resulting rebound from Kreuzer came to nothing as he fired over the crossbar.

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April 27, 2016, 3:13 pm
Avon Youth Baseball
4 - 2
v v v

Match Report

All eleven Scottish players were selected from Queen’s Park, the leading Scottish club at this time. Scotland had hoped to obtain the services of Arthur Kinnaird of The Wanderers and Henry Renny-Tailyour of Royal Engineers but both were unavailable. The teams for this match were got together “with some difficulty, each side losing some of their best men almost at the last moment” The Scottish side was selected by goalkeeper and captain Robert Gardner. The English side was selected from nine different clubs and was selected by Charles Alcock, who himself was unable to play due to injury.The match, initially scheduled for 2pm, was delayed for 20 minutes. The 4,000 spectators paid an entry fee of a shilling, the same amount charged at the 1872 FA Cup Final.

The Scots wore dark blue shirts. This match is, however, not the origin of the blue Scotland shirt, as contemporary reports of the 5 February 1872 rugby international at the Oval clearly show that “the Scotch were easily distinguishable by their uniform of blue jerseys…. the jerseys having the thistle embroidered.” The thistle had been worn previously in the 1871 rugby international. The English wore white shirts. The English wore caps, while the Scots wore red cowls.

The match itself illustrated the advantage gained by the Queen’s Park players “through knowing each others’ play ” as all came from the same club. Contemporary match reports clearly show dribbling play by both the English and the Scottish sides, for example: “The Scotch now came away with a great rush, Leckie and others dribbling the ball so smartly that the English lines were closely besieged and the ball was soon behind”, “Weir now had a splendid run for Scotland into the heart of his opponents’ territory ” and “Kerr.. closed the match by the most brilliant run of the day, dribbling the ball past the whole field.” Although the Scottish team are acknowledged to have worked better together during the first half, the contemporary account in the Scotsman newspaper acknowledges that in the second half England played similarly: “During the first half of the game the English team did not work so well together, but in the second half they left nothing to be desired in this respect. ” There is no specific description of a passing manoeuvre in the lengthy contemporary match reports, although two weeks’ later The Graphic reported “[Scotland] seem to be adepts at passing the ball”. There is no evidence in the article that the author attended the match, as the reader is clearly pointed to match descriptions in “sporting journals”. It is also of note that the 5 March 1872 match between Wanderers and Queen’s Park contains no evidence of ball passing.

On a pitch that was heavy due to the continuous rain over the previous three days, the smaller and lighter Scottish side pushed their English counterparts hard. The Scots had a goal disallowed in the first half after the umpires decided that the ball had cleared the tape. The latter part of the match saw the Scots defence under pressure by the heavier English forwards. The Scots played two full backs, two half backs and six forwards. The English played only one full back, one half back and eight forwards. Since three defenders were required for a ball played to be onside, the English system was virtually a ready-made offside trap. Scotland would come closest to winning the match when, in the closing stages, a Robert Leckie shot landed on top of the tape which was used to represent the crossbar.[1] At some point in the game, the England goalkeeper, Robert Barker, decided to join the action outfield when he switched places with William Maynard.